People Interact

Blog about people-centered design by Lisa Chow and Sandra Sajonas.

Tag Archives: method-spotlight

Monthly Method Spotlight: Desirability Testing

Desirability Testing

What: Desirability testing studies users’ emotional response to a design.

When/why: This method is most useful when you are trying to make a good first impression with your target audience. Desirability testing can be used to inform the team as to why different designs evoke certain responses.

How: Using limited, chosen vocabulary, ask users’ to picks words that most relevantly describe the design. Use a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods like triading, questionnaires, and card sort.

Tips: See Microsoft’s reaction cards for a list of 118 pre-selected descriptor words.

Interested in using/applying these methods in your work? Contact us for information.

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Monthly Method Spotlight: Contextual Inquiry

Contextual Inquiry

When/why: Contextual inquiries are more natural and sometimes more realistic as a result. They are also usually less formal and don’t use tasks or scripts.

How: Researchers watch & listen as users work in the user’s own environment instead of a lab.

Tips: Contextual inquiry can be combined with any number of other UX methods.

Interested in using/applying these methods in your work? Contact us for more info.

Monthly Method Spotlight: Cultural Probes

Cultural Probes

When/why: To compare perceptions and behaviors within or across cultures.

How: Assemble a journal kit or even better a camera journal kit and distribute to participants within 1 or across many cultures.

Tips: See cross-cultural comparison and camera journal research methods.

Interested in using/applying these methods in your work? Contact us for more info.

Monthly Method Spotlight: 80/20 Rule

80/20 Rulee5ece569c365396ed9dae4c23a972adc

What: The  80/20 Rule or Pareto principle is named after economist Vilfredo Pareto and specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The principle states that 20% of the invested input is responsible for 80% of the results obtained.

When/why: The 80/20 rule can used in helping you make decisions in your user experience work. Wherever there is data that can be quantified there’s the possibility that you can use this rule to focus your efforts on the areas of your work that bring the most results.

How: For example, 80/20 can be applied to website usability. Analyze data to determine your website’s 20% most-used functions and concentrate on enhancing these functions. Don’t spend too much time optimizing stuff that falls in the 80% that’s not often used

Tips: When using the 80/20 rule in UX research to be mindful of sample or data size. You need to ensure that your research or analysis covers a sufficient sample size to be statistically relevant. 80/20 is a quick & dirty method and is by no means exacting in its results.

Interested in using/applying these methods in your work? Contact us for information.

Monthly Method Spotlight: We Want To Know

feedbackA few years ago, we started a new series Monthly Method Spotlight where each month we focused on one people-centered method that you may find helpful for your work. We use these methods for various projects to develop, implement, and/or evaluate.

As per our usual What, When/Why and How in our Monthly Method Spotlight series, we want to know –

  • What methods have you used in your work?
  • When/why did you use those methods?
  • How did you use those methods?
  • How did it go? Would you use those methods again?