People Interact

Blog about people-centered design by Lisa Chow and Sandra Sajonas.

Monthly Archives: May 2018

Wandering Librarian: The Book Trader

I was wandering around in Philly and came across a bookstore called The Book Trader. With books stacked from almost ceiling to floor, it was an overwhelming (so many books) yet interesting browsing experience. Also, you can’t go wrong with Mickey and Minnie in the kids’ section.

 

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May 14th Event Recap: Asian American Librarians and Library Services

As contributors to the newest and first book on this topic: Asian American Librarians and Library Services: Activism, Collaborations and Strategies, we (along with a couple of fellow Pratt alums and others) were a part of a panel at Pratt last week There were lots of interesting discussions as well as those I can totally relate nods, laughs, stories, and perspectives shared. Check out the write-up in American Libraries.

We talked a bit about our chapter titled Going Beyond the Bamboo Ceiling: Issues and Challenges for Asian Pacific American Patrons and Librarians.

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Wandering Librarian: A Little Library in Philly

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I was in Philly recently and came across A Little Library. It’s interesting to see the different little libraries (how they’re set up, what the library is made out of, and of course, what kind of books there are).

In this case, there are two separate little libraries: one is for children’s books and the other is for non-children’s books. A little house was made for the children’s books and a newspaper dispenser is being used for the other books.

It’s good to see that books are made easily accessible in many communities and neighborhoods via the little libraries.

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Monthly Method Spotlight: MoSCoW Prioritization

MoSCoW Prioritization

What & Why:  There can be a lot of features/requirements when it comes to project ideas and projects, also many with short timelines and quick turnaround times. How do you prioritize them? One way to prioritize when managing projects is to use the MoSCow method.

M – MUST HAVE:
Features/Requirements that are non-negotiable for the success of the project.

S – SHOULD HAVE:
High-priority requirements/features that are not critical to launch but are considered important and of a high value.

C – COULD HAVE:
Features/requirements that are desirable but not necessary. May be removed or pushed to future stage of development if project completion timeline is at risk.

W – WOULD LIKE TO HAVE BUT WON’T HAVE (AT THIS TIME): Features/requirements that will not be implemented in a current release but may be included in a future stage of development. Such requirements usually do not affect the project success.

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How: Request input from your project team and stakeholders using the method. Use a combination of other methods such as dot-voting. This method can also be used in your personal life; anything from making a major purchase like a house or a car (what features are a must have, etc.) to cooking a meal (what ingredients are a must have, what can be skipped, etc.)

We cover the MoSCoW method and other project management methods in our getting started in project management workshop for librarians

Interested in using/applying these methods in your work? Contact us for information.